Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 15 May 2020

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – the world of photography continues to evolve in the face of Covid-19. This week features the reimagined Carmignac Photojournalism Award which in 2020 is concerned with the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Plus The Independent Photographer’s 2020 Portrait Photography Award is now open for entries. Closes 31 May. Judged by acclaimed American photographer Dan Winters, the prize offers cash as well as the opportunity to exhibit in Berlin and Milan.

Award: 

Carmignac Photojournalism Laureate Finbarr O’Reilly

Earlier this year Canadian-British photojournalist Finbarr O’Reilly was awarded the 11th Carmignac Photojournalism Award which in 2020 is focused on the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Annually the Carmignac Photojournalism Award funds the production of an investigative photo reportage on human rights violations, and geo-strategic issues.

In January O’Reilly began his reportage in DRC only to be halted by the pandemic a few weeks later.

CARMIGNAC-FOR1944LR
Neighbours and Red Cross safe and dignified burial workers in protective clothing gather outside the home of a family where an 11-month-old girl has died during Congo’s Ebola outbreak in the town of Rutshuru in Congo’s North Kivu Province, February 2020. © Finbarr O’Reilly for Fondation Carmignac
CARMIGNAC-FOR1932
Neighbours and Red Cross safe and dignified burial workers in protective clothing gather outside the home of a family where an 11-month-old girl has died during Congo’s Ebola outbreak in the town of Rutshuru in Congo’s North Kivu Province, February 2020. © Finbarr O’Reilly for Fondation Carmignac

The Fondation Carmignac team moved quickly to reimagine what this reportage project might look like in a period when travel was restricted.

Enter “Congo in Conversation” by Finbarr O’Reilly, a “collaborative online chronicle which, through close cooperation with Congolese journalists and photographers (as well as journalists of other nationalities based in the DRC), will address the human, social and ecological challenges that the Congo faces today with this new health crisis.” DRC is no stranger to disease having successful battled Ebola.

At present there are ten contributors in addition to O’Reilly. Some of the other photographers’ work to date includes:

Moses Sawasawa 1
Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo, April 2, 2020. Vendors and shoppers at Kituku market on the shores of Lake Kivu. Congo has one of the highest rates of informal workers in the world with about 80 per cent of urban workers involved in the informal economy, according to the World Bank. The Trade Union Confederation of Congo estimates that nationally the informal economy represents an astronomical 97.5 per cent of all workers. © Moses Sawasawa for Fondation Carmignac
Justin_Makangara_20200404_002
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, mid-March, 2020. A market in Democratic Republic of Congo’s capital. Congolese authorities closed schools and shut down major commercial activities to enforce social distancing. Many people weren’t taking precautions and didn’t believe the virus was a threat to them during the early days of the pandemic. © Justin Makangara for Fondation Carmignac
Arlette Bashizi _8893_2-2 copy
Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo, early April 2020. Three days after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in Congo’s eastern city, disinfectant started being distributed. This woman lives in the Katoyi neighborhood, where residents do not have easy access to water. © Arlette Bashizi for Fondation Carmignac
IMG_0136
From the project Black Consciousness Pamela Tulizo’s inquiry into ideas about African women, beauty, and self-esteem in a post-colonial world. © Pamela Tulizo for Fondation Carmignac

“Relaying information via a dedicated website and social networks, “Congo in
Conversation” will provide an unprecedented stream of articles, photo reportages
and videos. Updated regularly, it will enable readers to discover how the DRC is
coping with this crisis and adapting to the realities that now shape all of our lives.”

This is a fascinating adaptation of the programme which made its debut on Visa pour l’image Instagram account at the end of April.

Who is Finbarr O’Reilly?

If you haven’t heard of O’Reilly he’s an independent photographer and multimedia journalist, and the author of the nonfiction memoir, Shooting Ghosts, A U.S. Marine, a Combat Photographer, and Their Journey Back from War (Penguin Random House 2017). His work is regularly published in The New York Times and he was named the Nobel Peace Prize exhibition photographer for 2019.

Finbarr, who is now based in Dublin, has spent much of the past 20 years working in conflict zones in the DRC, Chad, Sudan, Afghanistan, Libya, and Gaza. In 2013 his documentary film Ebola in the Congo won a Peabody Award. Somehow he’s managed to hold academic fellowships at Harvard, Yale, and Columbia University too!

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